Dictionary of Playground Slang (Online)

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0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
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... as nick

Intensifier. Used as "Mike is hard as nick", or "Don't eat the curry! It's hot as nick". The 'nick' in question is probably a reference to 'Satan' rather than 'prison' or a specific person.

Source: circa 1970's, UK (Scot.)
a. o. t.
abbr.

To trip, fall over, etc. Short form of 'arse over tit'. Used as "I caught my foot on the cable and went a.o.t.!"

Source: circa 2005, AUS, NZ
A.B.C.
abbr.

Acronym used by British kids to refer to 'African Bum-Cleaner', but also used by Australian kids to cruelly trick the ir peers into a lose-lose situation. If they said 'yes', they were 'Aboriginal Bum-Cleaners', yet if they said 'no ', they weren't 'Australia's Best Cricketer'.

a.c.a.b.

Acronym for the phrase "All coppers are bastards" which means all policemen are unpleasant, racist, nasty, and vindictive, which of course simply can't be true. Also the foundation of a favourtie song:

I'll sing you a song
It won't take very long
All coppers are bastards

A.C.E.
abbr. A. C.rap E.ffort.

Used to alienate kids who said "ace". People who originally used "ace" to mean "good" suddenly found that the word had been redefined to mean "crap"., This was used in my part of Sheffield, South Yorkshire during the very early 90s and resulted in the total removal of the word "ace" from the school vocabulary because everyone was confused as to the meaning.

Source: circa 1990's UK (NE)
a gaans
colloq.

Equivalent to the American phrase 'I’m like...' e.g. 'An' a gaans why aye!', i.e. 'And I’m like: 'oh my god!

Source: circa current, UK (NE)
a into g
abbr.
Getting started on a project; abbreviated for of 'arse into gear' used as "Lord look at the time, I have to get my a into g!".
Source: circa 2002, NZ
ABC
abbr.

Version 1:

'African Bum-Cleaner'. Kids in the playground would often ask each other "Would you rather be an ABC, or jump off the cliff".

Anyone who didn't know what an ABC was, and gave that answer, would be 'hilariously' informed what an ABC was. The contributor said he couldn't, and still can't, see how being an ABC was worse than jumping off the cliff.

Version 2:

In Australia (and possibly the USA) ABC's can be Australian Born Chinese

Version 3:

ABC gum (already been chewed)

Source: circa 1980's, UK
Aberdeen on a Flag Day (like ...)
adj.

Quiet, peaceful. In the UK, a "flag day" is a public charity collection day where people exchange cash for lapel badges, or flags. The Scots are stereotypically stingy with money so are presumed to rather stay indoors when there is a chance they may have to part with some. Hence the streets are empty and quiet.

Source: circa archaic, UK (Scot)
abigail
n.
A middle-aged homosexual man who is in the closet.

(ed: The only Abigail I know of was a sexy Australian actress.)

ab
adj.
Contraction of 'abnormal'. Trendy way to say something is odd, unusual, strange or weird - usually in some undefined way, e.g. "Dave's gone ab on me.
ac/dc
sl.

Bisexual. Pronounced 'aycee-deecee', e.g. "I caught Janet kissing Melanie the other day whicle John was away. I didn't know she swung both ways! She must be ac/dc.".

Source: circa 1970's - current, UK , USA
aced
012

To do remarkably well at something, e.g. "I aced that test!".

Source: circa 1960's, UK (SE)
ace
  1. adj.

    Wonderful, first class, "cool", really good. Originated probably with being 'number one'.

    Source: circa 1940's, UK (SE)
  2. abbr.

    Acronym for "A. C.rap E.ffort". Term is used to alienate kids who said "ace". People who originally used "ace" to mean "good" suddenly found that the word had been redefined to mean "crap". This was resulted in the total removal of the word "ace" from the school vocabulary because everyone was confused as to the meaning.

    Source: circa 1990's, UK (NE)
acid drops
n.

(1) type of sour sweet made from boiled sugar and flavourings.

(2) an acerbic comment made about a third party.

Source: circa current, UK
acid head
n.

One heavily into the use of LSD.

See also: lsd
acid house

The dance 'craze' that was a forerunner of the 'rave' but fuelled by the drug LSD rather than Ecstacy.

Source: circa 1980's, UK
acid
n.

LSD (Lysergic acid diethyl amide).

See also: lucy
acker
  1. n.

    When playing cards (invariably for lunch money) the 'Acker' was the name commonly used for Aces.

    Source: circa 1980's, UK
  2. n.

    Friend

  3. n.

    A person with no style or class

  4. n.

    Someone from the local council estate (Hard to believe kids were such snobs!). Used in Basingstoke (home of ackers) but may have been invented by the contributor and his sister. Through moving away from home now believed to have spread to London and North East. Recently more commonly used to describe anyone seen spitting/puking in the street, picking things out of bins or anyone exhibiting general prolateriat behaviour. The term originated in Somerset, England where it denotes a 'friend' or 'mate' which is where the entertainer 'Acker Bilk' got his name from! (ed: my apologies to the great Acker Bilk - for months if not years I thought he had carked it. Seems he is not only alive, well and still performing, but received an MBE a year or two ago - oops!)

    Source: circa. pre-1950's, UK (SW)
ackrite
abbr.

Combination of 'act' and 'right'.

Source: circa 1990's, USA