Dictionary of Playground Slang (Online)

to main page
0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
selected terms: 47 page 1 of 3
yack
  1. 012

    To talk, especially in a not very interesting gossipy non-ending sort of way.

    Source: 1920's onwards
  2. To vomit.
    Source: circa 1997, USA (MA)
yada yada yada
colloq.

Used to save time in conversations by not having to actually explain things that should be apparent... yada, yada, yada...

First heard on the Seinfeld show - don't know if it was in use before this.

Source: circa 1990's USA
yahoo
  1. n.

    A weird person; "What a yahoo!"

  2. Noisy obnoxious thug. Every parents nightmare when your daughter brings one home.

yakka, yakker
n.

Work esp hard work. As in "hard yakker", "farm yakker" common in North Yorkshire, but also used all over Australia with same meaning UK (NE), AUS

Source: AUS, UK
yak
  1. 012

    (ed: entered verbatim - thanks Brian))

    One that I heard not long ago - and that I used as a kid - in Loughborough, Leicestershire is to 'yak' a stone meaning to throw. it comes from the latin Iacio to throw. I was surprised to hear it used because only kids say it and it must have come down the ages since the Romans were here.

    Source: circa current, UK (E)
  2. n.
    An unattractive female, usually due to morbid obesity or bovine-like odor.
    Source: circa 1997, USA (MO)
yam-yam
n.

Derogatory Birmingham term from anyone from the Black Country area.

Source: UK (M)
yamp
n.

This was a commonly used term for someone who was from an unimpressive place and who acted like a total twat, and wore very old, cheap and scutty clothes, not unlike a hobo. Stanna was a good example of a yamp as he was from Blockley and most people would thank their chosen deity every day that they didnt live in or come from Blockley. if they did they would just gibber inanely all day and go home and shag their mum.

Source: circa 1970's, UK
yank
  1. 012 "to yank"; n. "have a yank"

    Male masturbation

    (ed: never thought about it before - oddly - but I wonder if using this as a description for the Northern part of the USA was coined by the South as a euphemism for 'wanker'?)

    Source: UK
  2. n.

    Citizen of the United States of America... or 'merka' as it seems to be pronounced 'over there'.

  3. To play a joke on someone; used for example as "Ha ha - yanked your sack, your kids *aren't* dead at all - ha ha!")

    Source: circa 2002, USA (CA)
yap
n.

Incessant chatter: often applied in response to vocalisation made by perceived inferiors, e.g."Shut your yap or I'll belt ya!".

Source: UK
yard sale

Contributor defines this as "when downhill skiing u fall really hard and your skiis, poles and goggle fall off and go everywhere. Starting to be used for lots of sports." In use, for example, you get "Dude, i just saw some poser take a mad yardsale on the double black diamond, I bet he's at the hospital right now."

Source: circa current CAN
yard
n.

Home. e.g "I'm tired - I'm going yard."

Source: USA
yarf
012
To vomit.
Source: circa 1997, USA
yatch
n. derog.

Woman. Also used as descriptor for homosexual. The word has been appearing more and more and is a general threat to our society.

(ed: or so it seems!)

Source: USA
yawn
n.

Someone considered to be tedious company, i.e. boring "You aren't going out with that yawn are you? He'll bore you to tears!"

Source: UK
yea-do speccy
colloq.

Sarcastic response to some claim so to be spoken in a voice dripping with sarcasm. Means roughly "Yes. Very likely. I expect so. Not."

Source: circa 1970's, UK (SW)
yeah right
colloq.
An expression of doubt or disbelief; "According to The Enquirer, aliens landed in Washington, D.C. yesterday. Yeah right!".
Source: circa 1998, USA (MI)
yellow packet
adj.

Insult directed at povvos, doleys and so on. Derived from Fine Fare supermarket's economy range of "Yellow Packet" products. Being seen with a bag of Yellow Packet crisps was tantamount to admitting you were receiving free school meals. "Ey, them trainies are dead yellow packet they are!", (Used during the early "Thatcher Years").

Source: UK (NW)
yellowbelly
n.

Coward.

Source: UK
yem, hyem
n.

Home, in use for example as "Aa’m gaan yem!", meaning "I'm going home".

Source: UK (NE)
yer mum

General "fuck off" kind of answer to most questions eg What was th e homework? - Yer mum. Or, What did you do last night? - Yer mum. You get the picture.

Source: circa 1980's, UK (Sarf Lundun)