Gay Slang Dictionary

to main page
0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
selected terms: 85 page 1 of 3
radar
n.
The ability of one gay person to recognize or find another gay person.
See also: gadar, gaydar
Source: [1980's]
radical drag
n.
Man wearing woman clothing, and beards at the same time.
Source: [1970's]
railroad queen
Homosexual who cruises hobo jungles to find a tramp to love.
Source: [dated 1940's]
rainbow
n.
A symbol celebrating the uniqueness and diversity within the GLB community. Often displayed in the form of a flag or "freedom rings" (a necklace of multicolored rings).
rainbow dick
colloq.
Penis that takes a downward curve, instead of the normal upward curve.
rainbow flag
colloq.
The Alyson Almanac: A Treasury of Information for the Gay and Lesbian Community describes Rainbow Flag as follows:

In 1978, Gilbert Baker of San Francisco designed and made a flag with six stripes representing the six colors of the rainbow as a symbol of gay and lesbian community pride. Slowly the flag took hold, offering a colorful and optimistic alternative to the more common pink triangle symbol. Today it is recognized by the International Congress of Flag Makers, and is flown in lesbian and gay pride marches worldwide. In 1989, the rainbow flag received nationwide attention after John Stout successfully sued his landlords in West Hollywood, when they prohibited him from displaying the flag from his apartment balcony. Meanwhile, Baker is still in San Francisco, and still making more flags.

The Rainbow Flag by Steven W. Anderson appeared in GAZE Magazine (Minneapolis), #191, on 28 May 1993, p. 25:

Color has long played an important role in our community's expression of pride. In Victorian England, for example, the color green was associated with homosexuality. The color purple (or, more accurately, lavender) became popularized as a symbol for pride in the late 1960s - a frequent post-Stonewall catchword for the gay community was "Purple Power". And, of course, there's the pink triangle. Although it was first used in Nazi Germany to identify gay males in concentration camps, the pink triangle only received widespread use as a gay pop icon in the early 1980s. But the most colorful of our symbols is the Rainbow Flag, and its rainbow of colors - red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple - represents the diversity of our community.

The first Rainbow Flag was designed in 1978 by Gilbert Baker, a San Francisco artist, who created the flag in response to a local activist's call for the need of a community symbol. (This was before the pink triangle was popularly used as a symbol of pride.) Using the five-striped "Flag of the Race" as his inspiration, Baker designed a flag with eight stripes: pink, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. According to Baker, those colors represented, respectively: sexuality, life, healing, sun, nature, art, harmony, and spirit. Baker dyed and sewed the material for the first flag himself - in the true spirit of Betsy Ross.

Baker soon approached San Francisco's Paramount Flag Company about mass producing and selling his "gay flag". Unfortunately, Baker had hand-dyed all the colors, and since the color "hot pink" was not commercially available, mass production of his eight-striped version became impossible. The flag was thus reduced to seven stripes.

In November 1978, San Francisco's gay community was stunned when the city's first openly gay supervisor, Harvey Milk, was assassinated, Wishing to demonstrate the gay community's strength and solidarity in the aftermath of this tragedy, the 1979 Pride Parade Committee decided to use Baker's flag. The committee eliminated the indigo stripe so they could divide the colors evenly along the parade route - three colors on one side of the street and three on the other. Soon the six colors were incorporated into a six-striped version that became popularized and that, today, is recognized by the International Congress of Flag Makers.

In San Francisco, the Rainbow Flag is everywhere: it can be seen hanging from apartment windows throughout the city (most notably in the Castro district), local bars frequently display the flag, and Rainbow Flag banners are hung from lampposts on Market Street (San Francisco's main avenue) throughout Pride Month. Visiting the city, one can not help but feel a tremendous sense of pride at seeing this powerful symbol displayed so prominently.

Although the Rainbow Flag was initially used as a symbol of pride only in San Francisco, it has received increased visibility in recent years. Today, it is a frequent sight in a number of other cities as well - New York, West Hollywood, and Amsterdam, among them. Even in the Twin Cities, the flag seems to be gaining in popularity. Indeed, the Rainbow Flag reminds us that ours is a diverse community - composed of people with a variety of individual tastes of which we should all be proud.

Sources used for this article were found at Quatrefoil Library in St. Paul, and include: "Vexed by Rainbows", by Paul Zomcheck, in "Bay Area Reporter" (June 26, 1986); "Rainbow Flag" in "The Alyson Almanac" (1989); and "The Rainbow Flag", in "Parade 90: San Francisco Gay/Lesbian Freedom Day Parade and Celebration" (June 24, 1990)

Also see: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs.cmu.edu/user/scotts/bulgarians/rainbow-flag.html
http://www.pinette.net/chris/flags/gay/rainbow.html

Source: http://www.pinette.net/chris/flags/gay/rainbow.html
ram job
  1. colloq.
    Anal intercourse.
  2. To lick or suck the anus usually as a prelude to fucking, to lubricate with saliva the anus.
rammer
n.
Nineteeth-century expressions for penis.
rancid flower
n.
An elderly male homosexual.
raptophilia
n.
A person with this fetish is sexually aroused by the idea of being raped.
See also: biastophilia
rash
rat
  1. n.
    Young male, in league with the police to entrap homosexuals into performing act of sex in a public place.
  2. Any boy under the age of consent, that seduces an adult to have sex with him, then informer to the police.
  3. Someone that is a informer; [He is a rat a he will drop a dime on you.].
    See also: cheese bun, cheese eater, gay dirt, ratted, to tell on someone, to inform
raw sex
n.
Fucking without using a condom.
See also: bareback
read braille
colloq.
To touch or handle the buttocks legs or crotch; to fondle another person's clothed genitals.
ream somebody out
  1. colloq.
    To lick or suck the asshole.
  2. To lubricate an asshole with saliva, usually as a prelude to fucking.
  3. To widen the opening of the asshole with the tongue.
    See also: rim
  4. To stimulate the anus, either with the penis or orally.
ream
  1. 012
    To lick or suck the anus.
  2. Usually as a prelude to fucking, to lubricate with saliva the anus.
  3. To widen the opening of the anus with the tongue.
rear specialist
colloq.
Tn anal intercourse the man who fucks, as opposed to the one who is fucked.
recky
abbr.
The rectal opening, anus; asshole.
Source: [fr short for rectum]
rectify
n.
Anal intercourse.
red necktie
  1. colloq.
    In 1909 the Chicago Vice Commission reported that male homosexuals recognized each other by wearing red neckties. the wearing a red necktie was a code by which gay men could identify one another. The red necktie was used up in to the 1950's.
  2. lit.
redneck
n.
A bigoted narrow minded person.
reef
  1. n.
    To touch or handle the buttocks legs or crotch; to fondle another person's clothed genitals.
  2. lit.
release
  1. 012
    To piss [I need to go release the beer].
  2. lit.
religion
  1. n.
    A circumcised cock. [I don't need to see your religion.].
  2. lit.
reltney
  1. n.
    The penis.
  2. lit.
rent boys
  1. colloq.
    Male prostitutes.
  2. lit.
rent-boy
  1. colloq.
    A male prostitute.
  2. lit.
rented tux
  1. colloq.
    A condom.
  2. lit.
    A hustler or professional escort, hired for the night.
    See also: Cinderella Fella
RFD
  1. abbr.
    Is a reader-written journal for gay men which focuses on country living. P. O. Box 68, Liberty, TN 37O95
    http://www.rfdmag.org/
  2. lit.
riah
  1. abbr.
    Hair. This is an example of the polari underground gay language used in the British Merchant Marine.
  2. lit.